The Fund for Modern Courts is a nonprofit, statewide court reform
organization dedicated to improving the administration of justice in New
York. Our goals are to enhance the quality, diversity and independence of
the judiciary, improve the jury system, and make the courts more efficient,
fair and responsive to all seeking justice.
2003 was an extraordinary year in New York’s
courts, producing both alarming scandal and
promising new initiatives for reform. Public
confidence in the justice system continued to erode
amid allegations of political influence and
corruption on the bench. Public concern about the
fair operation of the courts and concern about New
York’s judicial selection process have increased
dramatically. While most judges continued to
uphold the highest standards on the bench, it
became clear that problems inherent in New York’s
judicial selection process have captured the public
attention. Noting this serious concern, Chief Judge
Judith S. Kaye this year established the Commission
on Public Confidence in Judicial Elections, Chaired
by Modern Courts Chair Emeritus John Feerick, to
suggest improvements to New York’s current
system of judicial elections. The Commission issued
an interim report in December 2003, and will
produce final recommendations in 2004. Together,
these events have produced exciting opportunities
for court reform in New York, and Modern Courts
continued to play an essential role in promoting
change.
In 2003, Modern Courts had a successful year
building a constituency for court reform. Our
ongoing public education, research, and in-court
programming have been central to engaging
individuals in the work of the courts. In addition, new programs and
initiatives, including the introduction of the Cyrus R. Vance Tribute and the
opening of an office in the Capital District, have helped expand our impact
Test type
Report
To Our
Constituents
1
Victor A. Kovner
Ken Jockers
Fern Schair

with State leaders and communities in every corner of New York. As
Modern Courts approaches its 50th Anniversary in 2005, we look forward
to continuing our role as the leading citizens group dedicated to improving
the court for all who seek justice.
Citizen Court Monitoring
In 2003, the Citizen Court Monitoring program continued to bring the
voice of the public into the courts. Court Monitoring operates on the
premise that every individual can contribute to the fair and efficient
administration of justice, and this year our monitors continued to observe
court proceedings and facilities in numerous counties in the state, including
Saratoga, Suffolk, Queens and Schenectady. In addition, by engaging Judges
and court personnel in educating court monitors, the program strengthened
ties with court administration and established new relationships that will
ensure that our many recommendations are implemented.
Citizens Jury Project
Modern Courts’ Citizens Jury Project (CJP) has continued to provide
direct assistance to individuals who have questions or problems regarding
their jury service, while also producing important research about the jury
service system. CJP has expanded its impact by interviewing jurors,
collecting data about their impressions, and producing reports that make
jurors’ voices an important part of the planning process for the court
system. CJP has also continued to conduct facilities assessments this year,
producing a well-received analysis of improvements and ongoing needs in
the Supreme Court building in Kings County.
Education and Outreach
Modern Courts continued to present substantive public education
about ongoing developments in the courts. In 2003, we produced new
public forums on emerging issues in the courts. Almost Home: New
Developments and Next Steps in Adoption brought together experts in
foster care and permanency planning to examine the court system’s
“Adoption Now” program to expedite placements for more than 5,000
children. Our Hugh R. Jones Memorial Lecture offered Judges and the
general public the opportunity to hear an esteemed jurist, the Honorable
Howard A. Levine, speak about the critical elements of judicial decision-
making. Also, Modern Courts served as co-sponsor of the Pathways to the
Bench, which addressed crucial concerns about how to achieve a diverse
Report
To Our
Constituents
2

and representative judiciary. Each of these events offered citizens useful
information to the public about the workings of their courts, and
encouraged civic participation in ensuring fair end efficient justice.
To promote public debate about court improvements, Modern Courts
this year maintained a bold and active voice in the media and at public
events to ensure that attention remains focused on the need to enhance
and modernize the judicial system in New York. Throughout the State,
media continued to turn to Modern Courts as a reliable source of objective
research and information about issues affecting judicial independence,
access to the courts, and the effectiveness and efficiency of the judiciary.
In 2003, Modern Courts’ legislative affiliate, the Committee for
Modern Courts, also continued its critical efforts to promote constitutional
and administrative reform of the judicial system. While maintaining our
long-held position that merit selection is the best means to limit the
influence of money and politics in judicial selection, Modern Courts
expanded its policy this year to include proposals for improving the State’s
current system of judicial elections. Modern Courts’ new Statement on
Judicial Selection was developed with the understanding that our
organization would bring an important and well-respected voice to the call
for improving the current system while continuing to work toward our
ultimate goal of expanding merit selection throughout the State.
As the public call for judicial reform grows, and the need for
research, education and public participation continues, the coming year
will present important opportunities to improve the system. With
leadership from our Executive Committee Chair, Victor A. Kovner, and our
Board of Directors, we look forward to continued success in 2004. As
always, we are thankful to the many public-spirited corporations,
foundations, law firms, and individuals listed in the following pages who
have contributed so generously to our efforts to improve the quality of
justice in New York State.
Report
To Our
Constituents
3
Fern Schair
Chair
Ken Jockers
Executive Director

In October 2003, the Fund for Modern Courts inaugurated the Cyrus R. Vance
Tribute. Celebrating Cyrus Vance’s vision, accomplishments, and legacy of integrity
in government, the Vance Tribute honors a notable public figure who has made the
New York State Court system more efficient, fair and accessible to all. Modern Courts
was pleased to recognize New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer.
As an advocate, and as a proponent of the justice system as a means to protect
individual rights, Eliot Spitzer is an exemplary public servant. As Attorney General,
Eliot Spitzer has made New York a national leader in investor protection,
environmental stewardship, labor rights, personal privacy, public safety and
criminal law enforcement. Mr. Spitzer’s work on issues such as gun violence, white-
collar fraud, Internet marketing practices, air pollution and employee benefits has
earned him a reputation as “the People’s Lawyer.”
Cyrus R. Vance set an exemplary standard for public service throughout his
career. He served as United States Secretary of State, Chair of the Federal Reserve
Bank of New York, President of the City Bar Association, and was a Partner at
Simpson, Thacher and Bartlett, LLP. Mr. Vance was also a leader of the Fund for
Modern Courts, and served as the organization’s Chair from 1986 to 1990. In
addition to his notable career on the national and international stages, Cyrus
Vance was tireless in his efforts to reform the New York State Court system.
Among his successes was promoting the implementation of merit selection for
New York State’s highest court, producing the nationally renowned Court of
Appeals we enjoy today. The Cyrus R. Vance Tribute is supported by a generous
private donor grant through the Communities Foundation of Texas.
Cyrus R. Vance
Tribute
4
Modern Courts Board
Chair, Fern Schair,
presents The Cyrus R.
Vance Tribute to NY
Attorney General
Elliot Spitzer.
Tributes

Samuel J. Duboff
Memorial Award
5
Each year, the Fund for Modern
Courts presents the Samuel J. Duboff
Memorial Award to recognize a non-lawyer
individual or group who have made an
outstanding contribution to improving the
quality of justice in New York State. The
award is named for the late Samuel J.
Duboff, who served as Chair of Modern
Courts’ Executive Committee for 19 years,
and was a respected leader of many civic,
social service, and arts organizations.
The 2003 Duboff Award was
presented to two organizations whose volunteers improve the court system for all New
Yorkers: The Law, Order and Justice Society of Schenectady County and the Family
Abuse Court Services Program of the Mental Health Association of Westchester County.
The Law, Order and Justice Society (LOJ) provides dispute resolution, case
management, supportive services and advocacy to individuals involved in the courts
in Schenectady County. LOJ recently celebrated its 30th
Anniversary of promoting fairness and equality in the
justice system.
The Family Abuse Court Services Volunteer
Program, part of the Mental health Association of
Westchester, offers critical in-court help to victims. In
Westchester County, 5,000 women are battered and
4,500 children are physically or sexually abused each
year. Family Abuse Court Service volunteers help
victims negotiate the court system by explaining the
court process, providing emotional support and discussing a victim’s options,
accompanying clients to courts as non-witness friends, and assisting with referrals
to social and personal services a victim may need when leaving an abusive
relationship.
Past Winners of the Duboff Award include:
Members of the Duboff family (left to right): Modern Courts Board Member
David B. Duboff, Elizabeth Duboff, Robert S. Duboff and Judith Duboff
2002 EISNER, LLP AND MELLON
TRUST OF NEW YORK, LLC—
SEPTEMBER 11TH RELIEF EFFORT
2001 THE CAPITAL DISTRICT COURT
MONITORS
1999 THE VOLUNTEERS AT MY SISTERS
PLACE IN WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK
1998 THE VOLUNTEERS AT THE
CHILDRENS CENTERS IN THE COURTS
OF NEW YORK STATE.
1997 THE VOLUNTEERS AT THE JEWISH
BOARD OF FAMILY & CHILDREN'S
SERVICES COURT LIAISON PROGRAM,
AND THE VOLUNTEERS AT THE YWCA
VISITATION CENTER OF WHITE PLAINS
AND CENTRAL WESTCHESTER.
1996 DOLORES DEL BELLO, LAW
MEMBER OF THE STATE COMMISSION
ON JUDICIAL CONDUCT.
1995 THE CITY-WIDE TASK FORCE ON
HOUSING COURT.
1994 THE MONROE COUNTY COURT
MONITORS, AND THE ROCHESTER
CHURCHWOMEN UNITEDS TASK FORCE
ON COURTS.
1993 PAULINE FEINGOLD, VOLUNTEER
AFFILIATED WITH NUMEROUS CRIMINAL
JUSTICE AND COURT REFORM PANELS,
TASK FORCES, AND ORGANIZATIONS.
1992 EDITORIAL WRITERS, JOHN P.
MACKENZIE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES,
AND LEONARD O. HALPERT OF THE
BUFFALO NEWS.
1990 THE NEW YORK STATE COURT
APPOINTED SPECIAL ADVOCATES
(CASA).
1989 THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN
VOTERS OF NEW YORK STATE AND ITS
JUDICIAL DIRECTORS.
1988 THE COMMUNITY DISPUTE
RESOLUTION CENTERS PROGRAM.
1987 LILLEMOR T. ROBB, FORMER
CHAIR, STATE COMMISSION ON
JUDICIAL CONDUCT.
1986 THE DUTCHESS AND
WESTCHESTER COUNTY COURT
MONITORS
Board Members and Volunteers of
the Family Abuse Court Services
Program accept the 2003 Duboff
Award.
& Awards

Comments on Modern
Courts’ award-winning
program:
“One of the country’s
most effective projects
in bringing problems to
light and proposing
changes to correct
shortcomings.”
—The American Bar
Association
“…most well-run court
monitoring programs
in the nation.”
—The National Center
for State Courts
“…the catalyst for
virtually every
worthwhile judicial
improvement in New
York State.”
and
“…the model for
jurisdictions elsewhere
striving to make the
justice system more
responsive to citizen
needs.”
—The American
Judicature Society
Citizen Court
Monitoring
6
In 1975, The Fund for Modern Courts developed a program to give New York
citizens a powerful voice in how their courts are run. The concept, known as citizen
court monitoring, was simple: recruit a diverse group of volunteers around the
state to observe court proceedings in their communities. The monitors would
assess the courts from the point of view of those outside the legal system, and would
recommend improvements to make the courts more fair, efficient, and user-
friendly. The monitors’ findings and recommendations would then be published by
Modern Courts and released to court administrators, judges, court personnel,
lawmakers, bar associations, civic groups, the media, and others concerned with
how the courts function.
For more than 25 years, citizen court monitoring has been central to Modern
Courts’ efforts to involve the public in improving the administration of justice. Today,
our volunteer court monitors number more than 600 and work in 16 counties
across New York. Their efforts educate both the judiciary and the public; make the
courts more accountable to the communities they serve, and produce tangible
reforms that benefit all New Yorkers.
Tangible Results
Our dedicated group of citizen court monitors has sensitized the court system
to the needs of the public, and has been the catalyst for a number of significant
improvements. For example, new courthouses have been constructed, old
courthouses have been renovated, court security has been increased, in-court child
care facilities have been established, civility training for court personnel has been
instituted, the treatment of jurors has greatly improved, court calendars have been
reorganized to combat congestion, and new court informational services have been
developed. Court monitoring reports, and the testimony of Modern Courts staff, has
been instrumental at hearings before planning commissions and other
governmental agencies charged with investigating how our courts are functioning.
Recent Monitoring Activities
In keeping with its tradition of maintaining a rotating roster of court projects
around the state, Court Monitors observed several courts this year. During 2003,
monitors observed proceedings in the Suffolk County Family Court, Saratoga County
Court and the housing court in Queens County. Monitors found that these courts,
which impact on the lives of the average citizen, would benefit from public scrutiny
to address concerns about facilities, judicial response to litigants, and attorney
preparedness.
In addition to new projects begun in 2003, the Citizen Court Monitoring
Program released comprehensive reports this year on the Criminal Term of the
Supreme Court in New York County, the Saratoga County Family Court and the
Schenectady City Court.

Outreach
To complement its monitoring activities, Modern Courts organized lectures,
given by local judges and others, on court-related issues to educate monitors and
other interested parties in the community. The lectures included presentations by
Supreme Court Justice David Angiolillo on the operations of Westchester County’s
Integrated Domestic Violence Court, which allow cases involving domestic violence
to be heard by a single judge in one court, and Christine Olsen, Project Director of
the Suffolk County’s Family Treatment Court, on that court’s inventive approach to
integrating assessment, treatment, and support services with the processing of
neglect cases in the Family Court.
In 2004, Citizen Court Monitoring will continue to observe courts throughout
the state, including projects in the Supreme Courts in Nassau and Westchester
counties and the Saratoga City Court. A new project is also anticipated in Dutchess
County. The program will also issue reports on the Saratoga County Court, New York
County Criminal Court and several other courts.
Citizen Court
Monitoring
7
The Times Union
January 9, 2003
Watchdog report cites
problems with courthouse
Danielle T. Furfaro; Staff Writer
SCHENECTADY An independent watchdog group has concluded that
the Schenectady County Courthouse is too small, has only one adequate
courtroom, lacks conference space and is in desperate need of maintenance and
housekeeping.
The report, slated to be released today by the Capital District Court Monitors,
suggests that the court add another courtroom and another judge to take care of
an increasing caseload. The report also urges Schenectady County to increase
funding to the public defender's office so that it can hire more attorneys.
The nonprofit group’s assessment of the operations at the Schenectady County
Courthouse was the result of nearly six months of monitoring daily activity,
during which it found that restrooms were often out of order.
“Monitors felt that such safety hazards and deficiencies in essential mainte-
nance and housekeeping created an environment lacking in basic human dignity
for litigants and staff,” Court Monitor Director Helga Schroeter wrote.
Because of a mandate from the state Office of Court Administration, the
county had already been planning to find more space and eventually create a joint
city-county court facility, but that is not expected to happen for another three to
five years.
The Capital District Court Monitors is a branch of the Fund for Modern
Courts, a nonprofit, independent organization dedicated to improving courts in
the state.
In the past few years, the Capital District Court Monitors has also looked at
Albany Family Court, Schenectady Family Court and Saratoga Family Court.

The Citizens Jury Project (CJP) was created in 1995,
following a recommendation by Chief Judge Judith Kaye’s
Jury Project, a blue-ribbon panel designed to review and
reform jury service in New York State. CJP advocates for
individual jurors on service-related issues, records and
analyzes juror concerns, and publishes trimester reports of
its findings. By assisting individuals and promoting systemic
reform, CJP ensures that the jury system functions efficiently
and effectively so that jurors may focus on their pivotal role
as fact finders in our courts. In 2003, CJP’s role further
expanded to include assessing court facilities in New York
and Kings County and observing civil and criminal voir dires in counties throughout
southern New York.
In response to CJP’s reports on juror concerns, the Office of Court
Administration (OCA) and New York and King’s County court officials have
continued to improve juror summonses, signage, seating, acoustics, and access to
information on the process of service. The court system has demonstrated its
commitment to public feedback by meeting regularly with CJP staff in regard to new
initiatives and by seeking programmatic assistance from CJP staff and interns.
Court Facilities Surveys
This year CJP published the Kings County Court Facilities Assessment, its
second report based on surveys collected from jurors in assembly rooms and
courtrooms. In response to recommendations made in the report, Office of Court
Administration officials and Kings County court officials and staff have made
significant facilities and procedural improvements. For example, in the spring and
summer of 2004, new microphones will be installed for the assembly
room and the benches in the assembly room
will be replaced with new, accessible court
Citizens
Jury
Project
8
Kings County Supreme Court
“I’ve been coming here
[courts in New York
County] for many
years, and I feel the
change and see the
improvements. It’s
great that you have all
of these materials, the
movie is great, and the
clerk is doing a really
good job. I can see that
a lot of effort has been
put into the system.”
—CJP Juror Interview

Citizens
Jury
Project
9
furniture. In addition to facilities improvements, Kings County has responded to CJP
procedural recommendations and will soon provide multi-lingual, telephonic
information for jurors prior to service. The Kings County Court Facilities
Assessment is available at www.juryproject.org.
Voir Dire Monitoring
In June of 2003, CJP interns began observing criminal and civil voir dires in
supreme courts throughout southern New York. The impetus behind this project was
the Commission on the Jury, which was established by Chief Judge Kaye and is charged
with examining the issue of juror utilization. For the voir dire observation project, OCA
designed civil and criminal voir dire surveys that the CJP interns fill out, while interns
also provide written narratives of criminal voir dires. Since June, CJP interns have
observed over fifty voir dires in New York, Kings, Bronx, Queens, Nassau, and
Westchester County. In 2004, CJP will analyze this data, and OCA will write and publish
a report that provides observations on how civil and criminal voir dires are currently
being administered, and recommendations for how these processes can be improved.
Community Programming
While continuing to expand its in-court programs, CJP also reaches out to New
York communities through the Youth Mock Trial program (YMT). YMT was designed
to promote youths’ understanding of and interest in the legal system. In the course of
six weeks, CJP interns and staff teach 11-15 year olds about the legal system through
the preparation of a mock trial. In addition, YMT brings in members of the legal
community to talk with participants, address their questions and concerns about the
legal system, and teach the youth about their rights and responsibilities. During the
months of July and August 2003, fourteen young people from the Harlem Children’s
Zone’s Booker T. Washington Center participated in YMT. The Harlem Children’s
Zone is a non-profit, community-based organization serving at-risk children. On
August 6, 2003, the program culminated with the youths’ presentation of their mock
trial to Justice Milton Tingling of 60 Centre Street. In 2004, CJP will continue to reach
out to individuals and communities both in and outside of the courts.
CJP Director Jane Eggers (fifth
from left) with summer 2003
interns

“Even if it were
possible, I would not
eliminate concepts of
morality, justice and
fairness from the
judicial process. Such
values, of course,
should not merely be
based on the personal
moral code of the
judge, but rather the
historically enduring
standards of righteous
conduct and principles
of justice that reflect
the best in our
national character.”
—Hon. Howard A. Levine
10
Hugh R. Jones
Memorial Lecture
On March 31, 2003, the Fund for Modern Courts presented the second Judge
Hugh R. Jones Memorial Lecture at Albany Law School. The lecture is dedicated to
Judge Jones, the former Associate Judge of the New York State Court of Appeals who
was a leader in efforts to improve the courts. The lecture series honors Judge Jones
by promoting research and writing on issues affecting the judiciary.
Judith S. Kaye, the Chief Judge of the State of New York, introduced this year’s
speaker, Howard A. Levine, a former Associate Judge of the New York Court of
Appeals. Judge Levine’s lecture, The Common-law Tradition and its Critics: A
Jonesian Response, argued for an evolutionary versus a revolutionary approach to
jurisprudence.
Well over 100 people, including judges, students, and concerned citizens,
gathered in the Dean Alexander Moot Courtroom to Judge Levine’s speech. The
lecture series extends Judge Jones’ example of scholarship and integrity on the
bench by highlighting an established and well-respected jurist each year, and by
presenting the public with a thoughtful examination of the important standards of
jurisprudence.
The inaugural Hugh R. Jones Lecture, presented in 2002, was delivered by
former Court of Appeals Associate Judge Richard C. Wesley, now of the United States
Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Since its founding in 1955, Modern Courts has maintained a commitment to
informing the public about the judicial system and building a constituency for
improvements in the courts. Our outreach, education, research and public
programs form an essential part of our reform agenda.
A Victory on Assigned Counsel Rates
In 2003, Modern Courts played a role in helping increase assigned counsel
fee rates and improving access to justice for all New Yorkers. Community outreach,
public education, advocacy, and the testimony and surveys of our legislative affiliate
made Modern Courts part of a winning coalition that will ensure that more
individuals have access to quality free legal representation.
For nearly twenty years, the fee rates for attorneys representing the indigent in
criminal and family law matters stood still at $40 per hour for in-court work and
$25 per hour for work out-of-court. The result was a dearth of counsel willing to
take on cases for those in need of representation. As a result of the leadership of
Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye and the support of Modern Courts and others, the rates
were raised to $75 an hour for felonies and Family Court matters (eliminating the
distinction between in-court and out-of-court work), and $60 an hour for other
cases, such as misdemeanors. Although the new rates do not go into effect until
2004, the announcement of the new fee structure had an immediate impact on the
availability of counsel for the indigent.
The increase in assigned counsel rates is an important step forward for
ensuring quality counsel for litigants who cannot afford legal representation.
However, more remains to be done, and Modern Courts will continue the call for
broader access to justice in the coming year. In 2004 a new Commission on Indigent
Defense will review the system in its entirety. As part of this process, Modern Courts
will continue its active role in informing the public about the need for broader
services, and providing the information, research and public advocacy necessary to
improve the indigent legal service system for those who seek justice.
New Initiatives to Improve Judicial Elections
This year, the Committee for Modern Courts took an important step in
promoting improvements in New York’s current system of judicial elections. Modern
Courts has always held that merit selection is the best means to safeguard the
independence and integrity of the judiciary. Merit selection remains the primary
goal of our agenda for reform. While Modern Courts continues to pursue the long-
term Constitutional goal of expanding the use of merit selection for judgeships
across the state, this year we also took steps to promote immediate reform to the
current system of judicial elections and respond to the public outcry for
improvements in judicial elections. In June, our Judicial Selection Task Force,
Chaired by Board Member Carey Dunne, proposed a set of judicial election reform
proposals (see inset page 14) focused on improving the nominating process,
11
Community
Outreach
and
Education

12
Community
Outreach
and
Education
“The success of the
Integrated Domestic
Violence Courts
demonstrates the need
for restructuring the
trial court system
across the state.”
—Letter to the Editor,
Newsday

campaign finance and disclosure, voter education and standards of campaign
conduct.
The adoption of Modern Courts’ reform proposals was an important part of a
larger movement to improve judicial elections in 2003. In response to sagging
public confidence in the judiciary arising from a series of scandals involving money
and political influence, Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye established the Commission to
Promote Public Confidence in Judicial Elections, and chose former Modern Courts
Chair John Feerick to head the Commission.
Modern Courts has been fully engaged in the Commission’s public process,
conducting research and building a constituency to support substantive change in
the State’s system of judicial elections. Modern Courts Chair, Fern Schair, testified
during the “Feerick” Commission’s public hearing process, and Modern Courts
conducted research on campaign filings and public access to records that was used
by the Commission in creating its reform proposals.
In December 2003 the Commission presented its Interim Report to the Chief
Judge. Modern Courts was pleased that the Interim Report called for immediate
administrative reforms and policy proposals that reflected our own Judicial
Selection statement. Included among these proposals were the introduction of
broad-based, independent panels to evaluate candidates for judicial campaigns and
the expansion of the use of independent Judicial Campaign Conduct Committees to
review campaign behavior and hear allegations of inappropriate campaign behavior.
Support for the Code of Judicial Conduct
In 2003, Modern Courts joined with other community groups to protect New
York’s Code of Judicial Conduct. In the wake of the United States Supreme Court’s
decision in Republican Party of Minnesota v. White, which struck down Minnesota's
conduct codes barring judicial candidates from stating their views on disputed legal
or political issues, New York faced a challenge to its own code outlining proscribed
political behavior by members of the bench.
To ensure that standards for judicial behavior are maintained, Modern Courts
joined the Brennan Center for Justice in two amicus briefs that urged the
preservation of New York’s Code of Judicial Conduct. The Code of Judicial Conduct
establishes standards for judicial behavior while on the bench and during elections,
and outlines parameters of acceptable political activity by judges. The briefs
submitted by Modern Courts and a variety of other civic groups offered strong
support for the Code of Judicial Conduct as enforcing appropriate rules to meet the
public expectation that judges remain above the political fray.
Modern Courts’ participation in the amicus briefs impacted cases that had the
potential to allow wide-ranging political activity by sitting judges and create
significant pressure on judicial candidates to state their positions on matters that
13
Community
Outreach
and
Education

Community
Outreach
and
Education
14
The Committee for Modern Courts is a
nonpartisan, nonprofit, statewide court reform
organization founded in 1955. Led by concerned
citizens, prominent lawyers, and business leaders,
Modern Courts strives to improve the administration
and quality of justice in our courts. It is the only
organization in New York State devoted exclusively
to improving the judicial system.
The method of selecting judges in New York State
has a direct and significant impact on the fair and
efficient administration of justice. The Committee for
Modern Courts has adopted the following
statement, which at this time sets out, in broad
principles only, our position regarding judicial
selection for judges in the state.
1. The Committee for Modern Courts, as it has since
its inception in 1955, calls for the adoption and
public ratification of a Constitutional Amendment to
expand the use of merit selection to choose judges
statewide in New York. Merit selection represents
the best method of limiting external pressures on
judicial selection, and diminishing the role of money
and politics on the process.
2. Until a Merit Selection Constitutional Amendment
is passed by the Legislature and ratified in a public
referendum, the Committee for Modern Courts calls
for the adoption of rules and procedures to improve
the process of judicial elections. Reform of the
judicial election process will more effectively limit
the influence of partisan politics, decrease the role
of campaigning and fundraising, and help to safeguard
the independence and integrity of the judiciary.
Such reform should be instituted without delay by
political parties and appointing authorities, and
should also be advanced through legislation. Reform
should, at a minimum, consist of the following:
a. Nomination Process Reform
Judicial Nominations: Before any candidate
can be nominated for a judicial office in the
State of New York, there should be a
meaningful evaluation of the candidate’s
qualifications by an independent panel. Only
candidates who have been found “well
qualified” by such a panel should be nominated
for judicial office. The independent panel
members should be selected by independent
and diverse organizations or appointing
authorities, should represent the broad diversity
of the area, and should include laypersons as
members. There should be a limit (typically
three) on the number of candidates who are
approved by the panel for nomination for each
judicial vacancy. If the panel finds an elected
incumbent “well qualified,” no other candidate
should be approved by the panel for nomination
to that judicial position.
b. Campaign Finance and Disclosure
Voluntary Public Finance System: A public
finance system should be adopted through
legislation for all judicial candidates in the State
of New York. Candidates opting into the public
financing system should be subject to
contribution limits, campaign spending limits,
and threshold requirements to qualify for the
finance system. Candidates who meet the
requirements should be provided with public
matching funds to ensure adequate resources to
operate a campaign, particularly in cases where
an opponent has opted out of the campaign
finance system. To ensure a candidate’s right to
free expression, any public finance system
should be voluntary. The proposed campaign
finance system should be similar to that used by
the New York City Campaign Finance Board.
Disclosure: For judicial candidates inside and
outside the voluntary public finance system,
there should be a timely campaign donation
disclosure requirement, indicating the
candidate’s name, donor’s name, donor’s
affiliation, date of donation, dollar amount, and
source (individual/corporate/law firm/political
action committee) of each campaign
contribution. Further, candidates should be
required to submit detailed campaign
expenditure reports, and the donation and
expenditure information should be easily
available to the public through the Internet.
Voter Guides: Voters should be provided
with meaningful and objective information
about judicial candidates in advance of an
election. The best method to achieve this is
to include judicial candidates in voter guides
produced by a Board of Elections or other
independent organization. Voter guides listing
each candidate’s qualifications, professional
background, and screening panel and other
ratings should be distributed to all eligible
voters prior to an election.
c. Fair Campaign Practices Committees
Bar Associations and other organizations in
each County or Judicial District should establish
Fair Campaign Practices Committees, as
proposed by the New York State Bar Association
and the State court system, to address
inappropriate judicial campaign activities. The
Committees should educate judicial candidates
about campaign rules, secure pledges from
candidates to campaign in a dignified and
ethical manner, and resolve disputes regarding
judicial campaigns. Fair Campaign Practices
Committees should be distinct from the local Bar
Associations’ Judicial Screening Committees.
Modern Courts Statement on Judicial Selection Reform

could come before them on the bench. In one case, Albany County Judge Thomas
Spargo filed a federal lawsuit claiming that the State Code violated his rights under
the First Amendment. Judge Spargo’s lawsuit arose from disciplinary proceedings
held against him.
At the same time, two companion cases, Raab v. State Commission on Judicial
Conduct and Watson v. State Commission on Judicial Conduct, were proceeding in
the New York State Courts, also contesting the State Code of Judicial Conduct as a
violation of judges’ free-speech rights during campaigns. In June 2003, the New
York Court of Appeals issued a decision in Raab and Watson, upholding the State
Code of Judicial Conduct. The Court held that sitting judges may neither engage in
partisan political activities nor make campaign promises that interfere with the
impartial administration of justice as alleged in these cases.
In December 2003, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit agreed
with Modern Courts and others that the Federal Courts should have abstained from
hearing the Spargo matter, and that the case should properly be decided in the New
York State Courts. As a result, the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct
will resume its disciplinary proceedings against Judge Spargo for violations of New
York’s Code of Judicial Conduct.
In each matter, Modern Courts took an active role in promoting strong, clear
15
Community
Outreach
and
Education

Community
Outreach
and
Education
16
standards for judicial behavior on the
bench and during judicial campaigns.
Public Education: Judicial
Diversity; Adoption Initiatives
This year, Modern Courts also
continued its series of topical, timely
public presentations to ensure that
the community has access to
information about new initiatives and
ongoing concerns in the courts.
In October 2003, Modern
Courts co-sponsored a forum held at
Albany Law School entitled “Pathways to the
Judiciary: A ‘How To’ Guide For Attorneys”. The
session educated attorneys about the practical process of transitioning from the bar
to the bench, and addressed specific concerns of women and minorities when
considering judicial opportunities and increasing diversity in the Judiciary.
In December, the Fund For Modern Courts sponsored a program entitled
“Almost Home: New Developments and Next Steps In Adoption.” The focus of the
forum, held at the New York State Bar
Association, was the Unified Court
System’s Adoption Now
initiative, which has
promoted an expedited
process for finding
permanent homes for 5,000
children in foster care and
created new procedures for
future placements. Panelists
highlighted how the courts,
the State Office of Children
and Family Services, the New
York City Administration for
Children’s Services, and local
social services agencies have
collaborated to streamline the
adoption process and eliminate
obstacles to expedited
permanency for children.

Community
Outreach
and
Education
17
Voice for Reform and New Capital District Outreach
In 2003, Modern Courts also continued its vital role as the state’s leading
nonpartisan court watchdog, speaking out on such issues as judicial selection, court
restructuring, Rockefeller drug law reform, and other issues
that impact the public’s access to justice. We continued
to serve as a reliable, objective and informed source
for the media on the numerous issues affecting the
administration of justice in New York.
In October 2003, to increase our presence
throughout New York State, Modern Courts opened
an office in downtown Albany within walking
distance of the State Capitol, the Legislative Office
Building, the Court of Appeals, and the New York
State Bar Association headquarters. From this
office, the Fund for Modern Courts will organize
public education and information events for the
Capital region and Northern and Western sections
of the State, and will also organize and implement
Citizen Court Monitoring programs. In addition,
the Committee for Modern Courts will use the
office as a base for its advocacy work on policy
and legislative issues that impact the fair and
efficient administration of justice.

Officers
January 1, 2003–December 31, 2003
18
Senior Vice President, the American Arbitration Association. Currently Vice Chair, Committee on
Women and The Courts and President of the Childrens Law Center; Member of the Board, American
Judicature Society and Legal Services for New York. Has served as Executive Secretary and Chief
Administrative Officer of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, and as Program
Development Officer for the Soros Foundation-Open Society Institute.
Corporation Counsel, City of New York; formerly Partner, Proskauer Rose LLP; past President of the
Association of the Bar of the City of New York; former Chair, New York State Committee on Judicial
Administration; former Chair, New York State Appellate Division Task Force.
Professor and former Dean, Fordham University School of Law; Chairman, Board of Directors,
American Arbitration Association; past President, Association of the Bar of the City of New York;
former Chairman, New York State Commission on Government Integrity; President, Board of
Directors, Citizens Union Foundation.
Partner, Proskauer Rose LLP; United States Chairman of the Board of the Pirelli Group; past President,
American Judicature Society; past President, Association of the Bar of the City of New York; member,
judicial selection committee of Senator Daniel P. Moynihan; former legislative assistant to Senator
Jacob K. Javits.
Senior Counsel, Sullivan & Cromwell; past President, American Bar Foundation; past President,
American Bar Association; past President, American Judicature Society; past President, New York State
Bar Association and the New York Bar Foundation; former Counsel to Governor Nelson Rockefeller.
Partner, Davis, Wright, Tremaine, LLP, specializing in Communications Law and Civil Litigation.
Recipient of the Jerome Michael Award and the E.B. Converse Prize. Current Member, New York State
Commission on Public Access; past Member, New York City Mayor’s Committee on the Judiciary; past
Member and Chair, New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct; Former Corporation Counsel,
City of New York, 1990-1991.
Managing Partner, Jacob, Medinger & Finnegan, LLP.
Associate General Counsel, Time Inc. Former Assistant U.S. Attorney, Southern District of New York.
Member, Office of Appellate Defender. Fellow, John Woodruff Simpson.
Principal, Shack Siegel Katz & Flaherty P.C. Member, Board of Directors, Ark Restaurants Corp.
Former President and Member, Board of Directors, New York Civil Liberties Union.
Partner, LeBoeuf, Lamb, Greene, and MacRae, LL. Member, NYS Bar Association; Chair, Association of
the Bar of The City of New York’s Task Force on Restructuring of the New York Court System; former
Chair, New York State Bar Association’s Commercial and Federal Litigation Section.
Chair:
Fern Schair
Chair Emeritus:
Michael A. Cardozo
Chair Emeritus:
John D. Feerick
Chair Emeritus:
Robert M. Kaufman
Chair Emeritus:
Robert MacCrate
Vice Chair and Executive
Committee Chair:
Victor A. Kovner
Vice Chair:
Peter A. Cross
Vice Chair:
Milton L. Williams, Jr.
Secretary:
Donald D. Shack
Treasurer:
Jay G. Safer
The Fund For Modern Courts
Executive Committee
Victor Kovner, Chair
Peter A. Cross
Hon. Matthew T. Crosson
Hon. John R. Dunne
Robert R. Elliott
Jeremy G. Epstein
John D. Feerick
Hon. Audrey G. Hochberg
Elizabeth B. Hubbard
Robert M. Kaufman
Alfreida Kenny
Robert MacCrate
Hon. Jeanne B. Mullgrav
Arthur B. Newman
Jay G. Safer
Samuel Whitney Seymour
Donald D. Shack
Margaret L. Shaw
Milton L. Williams, Jr.
Court Monitoring
Committee
Elizabeth B. Hubbard, Chair
Catherine T. Brody
Alfreida B. Kenny
Robert MacCrate
Muriel Neufeld
Flora Rothman
Doris Shaffer
Finance Committee
Robert R. Elliott III, Co-Chair
Jeremy G. Epstein, Co-Chair
Peter A. Cross
John D. Feerick
Robert M. Kaufman
John J. Kirby, Jr.
Vincent A. Maffeo
Arthur B. Newman
Jay G. Safer
Richard H. Silberberg
Donald I Strauber
Milton L. Williams, Jr.
Nominating Committee
Samuel Whitney Seymour,
Co-Chair
Margaret L. Shaw, Co-Chair
Alfreida B. Kenny
Evelyn M. Stock
Carl Weisbrod
Milton L. Williams, Jr.
Samuel J. Duboff Memorial
Award Committee
Arthur B. Newman, Chair
David B. Duboff
Elizabeth Duboff
Judith Duboff
Robert S. Duboff
Robert M. Kaufman
Fern Schair
Samuel Whitney Seymour
John J. McCloy Memorial
Award Committee
Victor A. Kovner, Chair
John D. Feerick
Mel M. Immergut
Robert M. Kaufman
Donald D. Shack
Committees*
*Fern Schair and
Victor A. Kovner are ex-officio
members of all committees.

19
Board of Directors
Dean Joseph W. Bellacosa
St. John’s University School of Law
Prof. Catherine T. Brody
Michael A. Cooper
Sullivan & Cromwell
Evan A. Davis
Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton
David B. Duboff
Network Agency Corporation
Victor M. Earle, III
O’Melveny & Myers LLP
Robert R. Elliott, III
J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.
Jeremy G. Epstein
Shearman & Sterling
Joseph E. Geoghan
Dean Kristin Booth Glen
CUNY Law School
Dean Howard A. Glickstein
Touro College, Jacob D. Fuchsberg
Law Center
Dean Thomas F. Guernsey
Albany Law School
Alan J. Hruska
Cravath, Swaine & Moore
Bruce A. Hubbard
John J. Kirby, Jr.
Latham & Watkins
Glenn Lau-Kee
Koo Larrabee & Lau-Kee LLP
E. Nobles Lowe
Vincent A. Maffeo
ITT Industries, Inc.
Douglass B. Maynard
Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, LLP
Edwin B. Mishkin
Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton
Hon. Milton Mollen
Herrick Feinstein LLP
Hon. Jeanne B. Mullgrav
NYC Department of Youth and
Community Development
Muriel Neufeld
Arthur B. Newman
Blackstone Group
Robert C. Newman
Legal Aid Society
Mr. William O’Shaughnessy
Whitney Radio
Alan I. Raylesberg
Vinson & Elkins
Dean Richard Revesz
New York University School of Law
Dr. Flora Rothman
Gerald Schoenfeld
The Shubert Organization
Doris Shaffer
Margaret L. Shaw
ADR Associates LLC
Richard H. Silberberg
Dorsey & Whitney LLP
Arthur J. Soong
Soong & Liu
Donald I Strauber
Chadbourne & Parke LLP
Dean William Treanor
Fordham University
Michael Weinstein
Ark Restaurant Corp.
Carl B. Weisbrod
Alliance For Downtown New York
Dean Joan G. Wexler
Brooklyn Law School
Dean David Yellen
Hofstra University School of Law
Gay Young
New York Community Trust
Listing includes directors who served during 2003.
Affiliations for purposes of identification only.
The Fund For Modern Courts
John J. McCloy Memorial
Award Event Committee
Co-Chairs
John D. Feerick
Barry H. Garfinkel
Bettina B. Plevan
Melvyn I. Weiss
Members
Hon. Robert Abrams
Lenore H. Banks
Hon. H. Douglas Barclay
Hon. Richard J. Bartlett
Dean Joseph W. Bellacosa
John P. Bracken
Catherine T. Brody
Michael J. Chepiga
Robert Conason
Joseph C. Connors
Michael A. Cooper
Sol Neil Corbin
Peter A. Cross
Matthew T. Crosson
Evan A. Davis
David B. Duboff
Carey R. Dunne
Hon. John R. Dunne
David N. Ellenhorn
Robert R. Elliott, III
Jeremy G. Epstein
Haliburton Fales, II
Kevin J. Farrelly
Kenneth R. Feinberg
Dr. Joseph Fins
Peter E. Fleming
Alexander D. Forger
William P. Frank
Joseph E. Geoghan
Dean Kristin Booth Glen
Dean Howard A. Glickstein
Richard Godosky
Daniel L. Greenberg
Dean Thomas F. Guernsey
Robert L. Haig
Hon. Audrey G. Hochberg
Alan J. Hruska
Bruce A. Hubbard
Elizabeth B. Hubbard
Patricia M. Hynes
Mel M. Immergut
Josephine Lea Iselin
Gregory P. Joseph
Robert M. Kaufman
Thomas J. Kavaler
Alfreida B. Kenny
John J. Kirby, Jr.
Hon. G. Oliver Koppell
Rachel L. Kretser
William F. Kuntz
Glenn Lau-Kee
Dean David W. Leebron
Hon. Franz S. Leichter
Robert J. Levinsohn
Richard B. Long
E. Nobles Lowe
Robert MacCrate
Vincent A. Maffeo
Hon. Bernard S. Meyer
Henry G. Miller
Hon. E. Leo Milonas
Edwin B. Mishkin
Hon. Milton Mollen
Jeanne B. Mullgrav
Gary P. Naftalis
Martin S. Needelman
Arthur B. Newman
Robert C. Newman
Cecilia E. Norat
Muriel Neufeld
Barbara Berger Opotowsky
William O’Shaughnessy
Barry R. Ostrager
Maxwell S. Pfeifer
Joan T. Photiadis
Hon. John T. Racanelli
Alan I. Raylesberg
Roy L. Reardon
Dean Richard Revesz
Sheila Riesel
Flora Rothman
Barbara A. Ryan
Jay G. Safer
Gerald Schoenfeld
David A. Schulz
Samuel Whitney Seymour
Donald D. Shack
Doris Shaffer
Margaret L. Shaw
Paul L. Shechtman
Shirley Adelson Siegel
Richard H. Silberberg
David O. Simon
Arthur J. Soong
Evelyn M. Stock
Madeline C. Stoller
Keith C. St. John
Hon. Jeffrey G. Stark
Donald I Strauber
Robert B. Tierney
Dean William Treanor
Justin L. Vigdor
Mary Kay Vyskocil
Michael Weinstein
Carl Weisbrod
Dean Joan G. Wexler
Milton L. Williams, Jr.
Gail Yaus
Gay Young
Hon. Ruth Jane Zuckerman

Officers
January 1, 2003–December 31, 2003
20
The Committee For Modern Courts
The Committee for Modern Courts, the lobbying and advocacy affiliate of the Fund for Modern Courts, is a private,
nonpartisan nonprofit organization organized under 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code. The Committee
lobbies for legislation designed to improve the administration of justice in New York. Contributions to the Committee
for Modern Courts are not tax-deductible
Senior Vice President, the American Arbitration Association. Currently Vice Chair, Committee on
Women and The Courts and President of the Childrens Law Center; Member of the Board, American
Judicature Society and Legal Services for New York. Has served as Executive Secretary and Chief
Administrative Officer of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, and as Program
Development Officer for the Soros Foundation-Open Society Institute.
Corporation Counsel, City of New York; formerly Partner, Proskauer Rose LLP; past President of the
Association of the Bar of the City of New York; former Chair, New York State Committee on Judicial
Administration; former Chair, New York State Appellate Division Task Force.
Professor and former Dean, Fordham University School of Law; Chairman, Board of Directors,
American Arbitration Association; past President, Association of the Bar of the City of New York;
former Chairman, New York State Commission on Government Integrity; President, Board of
Directors, Citizens Union Foundation.
Partner, Proskauer Rose LLP; United States Chairman of the Board of the Pirelli Group; past President,
American Judicature Society; past President, Association of the Bar of the City of New York; member,
judicial selection committee of Senator Daniel P. Moynihan; former legislative assistant to Senator
Jacob K. Javits.
Senior Counsel, Sullivan & Cromwell; past President, American Bar Foundation; past President,
American Bar Association; past President, American Judicature Society; past President, New York State
Bar Association and the New York Bar Foundation; former Counsel to Governor Nelson Rockefeller.
Partner, Davis, Wright, Tremaine, LLP, specializing in Communications Law and Civil Litigation.
Recipient of the Jerome Michael Award and the E.B. Converse Prize. Current Member, New York State
Commission on Public Access; past Member, New York City Mayor’s Committee on the Judiciary; past
Member and Chair, New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct; Former Corporation Counsel,
City of New York, 1990-1991.
Partner, Whiteman Osterman & Hanna, specializing in Insurance Law; Environmental Law; Civil
Rights; Appellate Law. Member: Nassau County (President, 1967), New York State (Member, House of
Delegates, 1972-1977), and American (Member, House of Delegates, 1973-1976) Bar Associations;
District of Columbia Bar. Phi Delta Phi; Alpha Sigma Nu. New York State Senator, 1966-1989. Deputy
Majority Leader, 1987-1988. Assistant Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights
Division, 1990-1993. Chair, New York State Capital Defender Office, 1997-1999. Member, New York
State Judicial Screening Committee. President, Nassau County Legal Aid Society.
Retired from the New York State Assembly in 2000 after eight years in the Assembly and twenty-one
years in the Westchester County Board of Legislators. Chaired the Assembly Subcommittee on Adult
Education and the Legislative Commission on Solid Waste Management. Was the First Vice-Chair of the
Legislative Women’s Caucus and a member of the Assembly Committees on Education, Local
Governments, Transportation and Consumer Protection. Improved the funding formula for Adult
Education. While a member of the County Legislature, served two terms as Minority leader, and
chaired the County’s Criminal Justice Coordinating Council. Currently serves on the board of Planned
Parenthood of Hudson Peconic, Inc.
Commissioner, NYC Department of Youth and Community Development, Former Director of External
Affairs at the After School Corporation (TASC).
Partner, LeBoeuf, Lamb, Greene, and MacRae, LL. Member, NYS Bar Association; Chair, Association of
the Bar of The City of New York’s Task Force on Restructuring of the New York Court System; former
Chair, New York State Bar Association’s Commercial and Federal Litigation Section.
Chair:
Fern Schair
Chair Emeritus:
Michael A. Cardozo
Chair Emeritus:
John D. Feerick
Chair Emeritus:
Robert M. Kaufman
Chair Emeritus:
Robert MacCrate
Vice Chair and Executive
Committee Chair:
Victor A. Kovner
Vice Chair:
Hon. John R. Dunne
Vice Chair:
Hon. Audrey C. Hochberg
Secretary:
Hon. Jeanne B. Mullgrav
Treasurer:
Jay G. Safer

21
f
Board of Directors
Legislative Committee*
Matthew T. Crosson, Co-Chair
Jay G. Safer, Co-Chair
Laura C. Altschuler
Lenore H. Banks
Richard J. Bartlett
John P. Bracken
Gary S. Brown
Peter A. Cross
Hon. John R. Dunne
Kevin J. Farrelly
Robert L. Haig
Hon. Audrey G. Hochberg
John R. Horan
Elizabeth B. Hubbard
Robert M. Kaufman
Rachel L. Kretser
Hon. Franz S. Leichter
A. Thomas Levin
Hon. Jeanne B. Mullgrav
Robert C. Newman
Bettina B. Plevan
Helga A. Schroeter
Samuel Whitney Seymour
Donald D. Shack
Shirley Adelson Siegel
Jeffrey G. Stark
Evelyn M. Stock
Gail Yaus
Hon. Ruth Jane Zuckerman
Judicial Selection Task Force
Carey Dunne, Chair
Lenore Banks
Peter Cross
Matthew Crosson
Dr. Joseph Fins
Hon Audrey G. Hochberg
Elizabeth Hubbard
Victor Kovner
Hon. Franz Leichter
Robert Newman
Jay Safer
Fern Schair
Donald Shack
Shirley Adelson Siegel
Hon. Jeffrey G. Stark
Hon. Robert Abrams
Stroock & Stroock & Lavan
Laura C. Altschuler
Lenore H. Banks
League of Women Voters of New York State
Hon. Richard J. Bartlett
Bartlett, Pontiff, Stewart & Rhodes, P.C.
John P. Bracken
Bracken & Margolin, LLP
Gary S. Brown
NYS Department of Law
Victoria Cashman
Cashman and Associates
Mary Ann Cleaves
Capital District Court Monitors
Sol Neil Corbin
Taylor, Colicchio, & Silverman LLP
Matthew T. Crosson
The Long Island Association
Carey R. Dunne
Davis Polk & Wardwell
Haliburton Fales, 2nd
White & Case
Kevin J. Farrelly
Law Offices of Kevin J. Farrelly
Dr. Joseph Fins
Weill Medical Center
Robert L. Haig
Kelley Drye & Warren LLP
Rachel L. Kretser
Office of the Attorney General State of N.Y.
Hon. Franz S. Leichter
Federal Housing Finance Board
Hon. Howard A. Levine
Whiteman Osterman & Hanna
Richard B. Long
Coughlin & Gerhart, L.L.P.
Hon. E. Leo Milonas
Association of the Bar of the City of New York
Maxwell S. Pfeifer, Esq.
Joan T. Photiadis
League of Women Voters of New York State
Bettina B. Plevan
Proskauer Rose LLP
Hon. John T. Racanelli
Helga Schroeter
Samuel Whitney Seymour
Sullivan & Cromwell
Paul Shechtman
Stillman and Friedman, P.C.
Shirley Adelson Siegel
Keith C. St. John
Minority Counsel’s Office, New York State
Senate
Hon. Jeffrey G. Stark
Meyer, Suozzi, English & Klein, P.C.
Evelyn M. Stock
League of Women Voters of New York State
Justin L. Vigdor
Boylan, Brown, Code, Vigdor & Wilson, LLP
Gail Yaus
State University of New York at Binghamton
Hon. Ruth Jane Zuckerman
Fordham University School of Law
The Committee For Modern Courts
*Fern Schair and
Victor A. Kovner are ex-officio
members of all committees.

Test type
for the head
which ruys
In Appreciation
22
The Fund for Modern Courts
extends sincere thanks to those who
supported our 2003 efforts.
$10,000–$24,999
Foundations
New York Community Trust
Communities Foundation of Texas
Firms
Proskauer Rose LLP
Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher &
Flom LLP
$5,000–9,999
Individuals
Robert M. Kaufman
Corporations
ITT Industries Inc.
Schering-Plough Corporation
Firms
Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton
Davis Polk & Wardwell
Kramer, Levin, Naftalis & Frankel LLP
Kronish Lieb Weiner & Hellman LLP
Latham & Watkins
Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy
LLP
Shearman & Sterling
Sullivan & Cromwell
Foundations
Dorothea L. Leonhardt Foundation
$2,500–4,999
Individuals
Jeremy G. Epstein
Bettina B. Plevan
Corporations
Blackstone Group L.P.
Time Inc.
Verizon
WYETH
Firms
Dorsey & Whitney LLP
Feinberg Group, LLP
Gair, Gair, Conason, Steigman, &
Mackauf
Jacob Medinger & Finnegan LLP
Milberg, Weiss, Bershad, Hynes &
Lerach LLP
Patterson, Belknap, Webb & Tyler LLP
Seeger Weiss LLP
Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP
Torys
Foundations
The USAA Foundation
$1,500–2,499
Individuals
Roger R. Aaron
Michael A. Cardozo
David B. Duboff
Haliburton Fales, II
Elizabeth B. Hubbard
Victor A. Kovner
Arthur B. Newman
Fern Schair
Corporations
Blank Rome LLP
Loews Corporation
Pitney Bowes
Firms
Clark Gagliardi & Miller P.C.
Dewey Ballantine LLP Fulbright &
Jaworski LLP
Shack, Siegel, Katz, Flaherty, &
Goodman P.C.
Vinson & Elkins
$1,000–1,499
Individuals
Helaine M. Barnett
Michael A. Cooper
Sol Neil Corbin
Peter A. Cross
Carey R. Dunne
Prof. John D. Feerick
Vincent A. Maffeo
Samuel Whitney Seymour
Robert C. Sheehan
Hon. Jeffrey G. Stark
Earl Yaffa
Gay Young
Corporations
Eisner and Company LLP
Firms
Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
Epstein Becker & Green, P.C.
Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper & Scinto
Herrick Feinstein LLP
Jenkens & Gilchrist Parker Chapin LLP
Lankler Siffert & Wohl LLP
Mayer Brown Rowe & Maw LLP
Vladeck, Waldman, Elias & Engelhard,
P.C.
Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman &
Herz LLP
$500–999
Individuals
Prof. Beatrice S. Frank
John J. Kirby
Robert MacCrate
Douglass B. Maynard
Hon. E. Leo Milonas
Muriel Neufeld
Norman Redlich
Donald D. Shack
Margaret L. Shaw
Paul L. Shechtman
Anne Sidamon-Eristoff
Richard H. Silberberg
Arthur J. Soong
Charles A. Stillman
Evelyn M. Stock
Carl B. Weisbrod
Corporations
Forensic Investigative Associates, Inc.
Gutenberg Printers
Firms
Bracken Margolin & Gouvis LLP
Cohen Milstein Hausfeld & Toll P.L.L.C.
CUNY Law School
Fordham University
Godosky & Gentile, PC
Kean, Miller, Hawthorne, D’Armond,
McCowan & Jarman
St. John’s University School of Law

23
In Appreciation
$499 and Below
Individuals
Hon. Robert Abrams
Mark H. Alcott
Laura C. Altschuler
Michael J. Balch
Hon. Phylis Skloot Bamberger
Lenore H. Banks
Hon. Richard J. Bartlett
Dean Joseph W. Bellacosa
Stephen A. Block
Leonard B. Boehner
Eric B. Brettschneider
Prof. Catherine T. Brody
Gary S. Brown
Zachary Carter
Victoria Cashman
Mary Ann Cleaves
Ruth Cowan
Hon. Matthew T. Crosson
Evan A. Davis
Robert Duboff
Hon. John R. Dunne
Victor M. Earle
Hon. Betty Weinberg Ellerin
Robert R. Elliott
Sheldon H. Elsen
Kevin J. Farrelly
Myrna Felder
Dr. Joseph Fins
Fred Fishman
Hon. Helen E. Freedman
David Friedman
John Furfaro
Frederick H. Gillmore
Dean Kristin Booth Glen
Dean Howard A. Glickstein
Hon. Marcia C. Goldstein
Frances Gottfried
Bruce A. Green
Daniel L. Greenberg
Prof. John DeWitt Gregory
Hon.. Allan L. Gropper
Dean Thomas F. Guernsey
Robert L. Haig
Dennis R. Hawkins
Prof. William E. Hellerstein
Hon. Audrey G. Hochberg
Bruce A. Hubbard
Josephine Lea Iselin
Barry Kamins
Thomas J. Kavaler
Stephen D. Kaye
Alfreida B. Kenny
Hon. G. Oliver Koppell
Rachel L. Kretser
Glenn Lau-Kee
Hon. Franz S. Leichter
Hon. Howard A. Levine
Susan B. Lindenauer
Richard B. Long
E. Nobles Lowe
Michael M. Martin
Alfred Miller
Henry G. Miller
Hon. Karla Moskowitz
Hon. Jeanne B. Mullgrav
Robert C. Newman
Ceclia E. Norat
Kenneth C. Olson
Barbara Berger Opotowsky
Hon. John T. Racanelli
Alan I. Raylesberg
Kathy H. Rocklen
Alan Rothstein
Jay G. Safer
Dorothy Samuels
Frederick P. Schaffer
Lynn Hecht Schafran
Helga A. Schroeter
David A. Schulz
H. Richard Schumacher
Bart M. Schwartz
Doris Shaffer
Carol Sherman
Shirley Adelson Siegel
Hon. Jacqueline W. Silbermann
Hon. Jane S. Solomon
Madeline C. Stoller
Donald I Strauber
Stuart A. Summit
Dean William Treanor
Hon. Randolph F. Treece
Cyrus R. Vance, Jr.
Justin L. Vigdor
Dean Joan G. Wexler
Milton L. Williams, Jr.
Gail Yaus
Dean David Yellen
Hon. Ruth Jane Zuckerman
Corporations
JAMS/Endispute
Firms
Berke-Weiss & Pechman LLP
Coblence & Warner
Goodkind Labaton Rudoff &
Sucharow LLP
Mandel Resnik Kaiser Moskowitz &
Greenstein, P.C.
Morvillo Abramowitz Grand
Iason & Silberberg PC
Orans Elsen & Lupert LLP
Schoeman, Updike, & Kaufman, LLP
Foundations
Ford Foundation Matching
Gift Program

2003 Financial Report
with 2002 comparative statement
24
Audited
Audited
2003
2002
E X P E N S E S
Salaries
332,754
315,441
Employee Benefits and Payroll Taxes
70,935
55,978
Occupancy
75,731
70,370
Professional Fees
28,075
24,416
Conferences
10,735
5,348
Printing and Publications
16,429
15,786
Office Supplies
12,396
11,020
Telephone/Communications
8,117
7,445
Postage/Delivery Services
7,441
8,540
Equipment and Repair
17,070
27,740
Subscriptions and Dues
1,588
1,349
Travel
3,732
2,678
Depreciation
3,551
6,099
Internet Expenses
9,412
9,225
Miscellaneous
6,737
3,745
Insurance
2,608
3,391
TOTAL
607,311
568,571
I N C O M E
Unrestricted Income
599,405
602,563
Restricted Income
50,000
TOTAL
599,405
652,563
Surplus (Deficit)
(7,906)
83,992
The IRS has determined that contributions to the Fund for Modern Courts are tax-deductible under section
501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Copies of the audited financial statements are available from
Modern Courts upon request. A copy of our latest financial filing may be obtained by writing to the New York
State Department of Law, Charities Bureau, 120 Broadway, New York, New York 10271 or to the Fund for
Modern Courts, 351 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019.